Untitled

John Romang uses ink and resin to create free flowing organic shapes that are frozen in time. Each work is illuminated with a fluorescent light.

pulmonaire:

(via beyondneptune)

sfmoma:

thepacegallery:

Pier Paolo Calzolari, Donna Colonna, 2001, white skirt, iron, egg, ceramic, closed-loop pump © Pier Paolo Calzolari / Courtesy The Pace Gallery and Marianne Boesky Gallery
Performance is an integral aspect of Calzolari’s practice; he created happenings as early as 1966, drawing viewers into his artwork as performers in what he termed “an activation of space.”  Pier Paolo Calzolari: When the dreamer dies, what happens to the dream? is on view at 510 West 25th Street in collaboration with Marianne Boesky Gallery until June 2nd, 2012. 

Soooo nice!

sfmoma:

thepacegallery:

Pier Paolo Calzolari, Donna Colonna, 2001, white skirt, iron, egg, ceramic, closed-loop pump © Pier Paolo Calzolari / Courtesy The Pace Gallery and Marianne Boesky Gallery

Performance is an integral aspect of Calzolari’s practice; he created happenings as early as 1966, drawing viewers into his artwork as performers in what he termed “an activation of space.”  Pier Paolo Calzolari: When the dreamer dies, what happens to the dream? is on view at 510 West 25th Street in collaboration with Marianne Boesky Gallery until June 2nd, 2012. 

Soooo nice!

(via npr)

theclearlydope:

Clearly they should replace every couch from “casting couch” porno with this bed.

theclearlydope:

Clearly they should replace every couch from “casting couch” porno with this bed.

(Source: nickholmes)

thefluffingtonpost:

Area Kitty Upset by Mainstream Media Portrayal of Cats
Pickle, a local cat, is furious by the mainstream media’s negative portrayal of his species.  ”Cats are often depicted by the media as poor spellers, many times engaged in an activity with some sort of invisible friend, tool or instrument,” said Larry Owens, the cat’s lawyer.  ”Pickle feels that he speaks for cats everywhere when he says that he is sick of this damaging stereotype and how it is constantly reinforced by the mainstream press.”
Pickle is seeking a formal acknowledgement of the issue from the Society of Professional Journalists and plans to put together an educational packet entitled “The Rich History of Cats: No LOLing Matter” to be released this fall.
Via Steven2005.

thefluffingtonpost:

Area Kitty Upset by Mainstream Media Portrayal of Cats

Pickle, a local cat, is furious by the mainstream media’s negative portrayal of his species.  ”Cats are often depicted by the media as poor spellers, many times engaged in an activity with some sort of invisible friend, tool or instrument,” said Larry Owens, the cat’s lawyer.  ”Pickle feels that he speaks for cats everywhere when he says that he is sick of this damaging stereotype and how it is constantly reinforced by the mainstream press.”

Pickle is seeking a formal acknowledgement of the issue from the Society of Professional Journalists and plans to put together an educational packet entitled “The Rich History of Cats: No LOLing Matter” to be released this fall.

Via Steven2005.

(via npr)

sunfoundation:

Conducting Demystified

The New York Times, in collaboration with the New York University Movement Lab, explains music conducting in this beautifully produced video. It’s part interview with Alan Gilbert, music director of the New York Philharmonic, and part rendering of motion capture data, which represents Gilbert’s conducting.
To capture the data, the Movement Lab installed high-speed motion capture cameras, and Gilbert put on one of those funny-looking suits with the sensor balls on them. He conducted, and they recorded his body and his hands.

sunfoundation:

Conducting Demystified

The New York Times, in collaboration with the New York University Movement Lab, explains music conducting in this beautifully produced video. It’s part interview with Alan Gilbert, music director of the New York Philharmonic, and part rendering of motion capture data, which represents Gilbert’s conducting.

To capture the data, the Movement Lab installed high-speed motion capture cameras, and Gilbert put on one of those funny-looking suits with the sensor balls on them. He conducted, and they recorded his body and his hands.

(via npr)